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Does Your Pet Get the Zoomies?

cat and dog running outside

Does this sound familiar to you? You’re hanging out at home, maybe relaxing on the couch watching Netflix or surfing the web on your phone, and suddenly your dog or cat starts going wild. 

She’s zipping around the house at full speed, running in circles, with a goofy look on her face. And if you have another pet in the house, he’s probably decided to join the fun too.

It’s official — your pet has a case of the zoomies!

What Are the Zoomies?

Technically called “frenetic random activity periods” (FRAP), the zoomies are pent-up energy that your pet needs to express. They’re more common among puppies and kittens, but any breed at any age can experience a case of the zoomies.

Zoomies usually happen around the same time of day, like first thing in the morning or when you’re settling in for the evening. You might also notice it right after bath time. They’re also more common during the winter months, when it’s more difficult to get your pet outdoors to exercise. 

Dealing with the Zoomies

So, what to do about all this energy? A daily walk or a romp in the backyard is the best way to burn it off. That way it won’t manifest as the zoomies later on in the day.

If you can predict when the zoomies will hit, take your pet to a safe place in your home or a fenced yard where she can burn off that energy. You don’t want her bumping into anything and possibly injuring herself. Also, avoid chasing or running after her, as that can be interpreted as playing and will encourage your pet to keep running. 

Of course, you may decide you want to encourage the zoomies — it can be entertaining to watch and helps them release energy. If your pup stops for periodic play bows, that’s a great time to engage. Just keep an eye out that they don’t overexert themselves, especially if they have any health issues or injuries.

Zoomies are a natural part of pet behavior and shouldn’t be cause for concern. They likely just indicate that your pet needs regular exercise. However, if you think your pet’s zooming has become compulsive or abnormal, consult a veterinarian to have her checked out.